Djuna Day, Available Artwork

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Loops #4 1/4
Djuna Day
Woodblock (12x8 in) 2017
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Loops #3 1/4
Djuna Day
Woodblock (12x8 in) 2017
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Loops #2 1/4
Djuna Day
Woodblock (12x8 in) 2017
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Loops #1 1/4
Djuna Day
Woodblock (12x8 in) 2017
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The Elements, Composition #1 1/8
Djuna Day
Woodblock (24x18 in) 2017
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The Elements, Composition #2 1/8
Djuna Day
Woodblock (24x18 in) 2017
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The Elements, Composition #3 1/8
Djuna Day
Woodblock (24x18 in) 2017
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Series Five Totems: 55, 60, 76, 83, 86
Djuna Day
poplar, oil based pigments (44x5x5 in) 2018
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Series Five Totems: 82, 87, 88
Djuna Day
Poplar, oil based pigments (41x5x5 in) 2017
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Everything Seems Alright, Assemblage #12 (Disc 1)
Djuna Day
Ebonized douglas fir (60x60 in) 2017
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Everything Seems Alright, #13
Djuna Day
ebonized douglas fir (60x60 in) 2017
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Everything Seems Alright, #14
Djuna Day
ebonized douglas fir (56x42 in) 2017
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Everything Seems Alright, #15
Djuna Day
douglas fir, goldleaf (51x38 in) 2017
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Everything Seems Alright, Assemblage #10
Djuna Day
Ebonized wood (92x78 in) 2016
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Djuna Day

Photo of Djuna Day

Djuna Day is a self-taught artist, woodworker and furniture maker from Boston, Massachusetts. After graduating from New York University in 1996, she honed her woodworking skills in renowned furniture studios in Brooklyn and Long Island City before emigrating to Toronto a decade ago.

Day has been making assemblage sculpture for as long as she has been building furniture. In her heart the two are tightly linked. Day’s early sculpture functioned as commentary on the thoughtlessness with which we, as a species, consume our planet’s natural resources. Her work is a visceral reflection of the human drive to dismantle and reassemble the natural environment into ever more alienating landscapes. Her early sculptural pieces were created entirely from waste wood from her furniture projects.

Although no longer produced from discarded material, Day’s new work continues to reflect the same theme. Focusing on the interconnectedness of all of our actions in a closed environment, her work asks us to consider our place in the natural world, and how the choices we make now narrow the choices available in the future.

Day has exhibited in group shows in Toronto, including the Grow-Op exhibition at the Gladstone Hotel, and has works in private collections throughout the city, including an installation in the lobby of the DNA Condominiums on King Street West, Toronto.

Day currently lives in Toronto with her family and works out of her west-end studio.